M.o.p.

Yo, what’s up, rap fans! Here is an article written about a rap band by the name “M.O.P.” which is shortened for “Mash Out Posse.” As you can see, it’s two boys in a group, one named Billy Danze and the other who is smaller Lil’ Fame. I bring to you the hottest rap band in NY City.

Their release “First Family 4 Life” on Relativity Records represents the
straight up ghetto shit. Now, a few words from the two boys:"You got all types of hip-hop but we represent street music," 23-year-old Fame (a/k/a "Fizzy Womack") explains. "That's all we know, so that's the kind of music that we make. The fashion hip-hop's taken over things for the past couple of years so we gotta even it out. After you get tired of listening to that, you're gonna wanna hear the rawness."

"You got everybody else goin' platinum and gettin' all this attention," adds Billy (a/k/a "William Berkowitz"), age 24. "But we got the real hip-hop here. We got what people really need to hear--the straight-up ghetto music."

There you go, a few words from our boys. Now, they had a last album out called “Firing Squad.” Much of “First Family 4 Life’s production is supervised by M.O.P.’s longtime champion, DJ Premiere of Gang Starr.

Thus, consummate, straight-up ghetto music is what the LP delivers in abundance from its adrenaline-inducing outset: "Most dudes don't like the way I rep/The brown-skinned cat with the helluva fast step/Berkowitz/Retreat!/I will never be disconnected from these streets," Billy spits on First Family's Premier-produced opening salvo, "Breakin' The Rules." But while Fame and Billy's high-octane exchanges prove to be as sharp as ever over snapping snares and truncated whistles, the track's added bonus is Preem's chorus, which neatly sums up the group's musical philosophy: "We make ghetto music/Rock that/When it drops if it's proper/Cop that! /Cuz some cats be fakin' the moves/In other words, breakin' the rules/Stop that!"

Fame and Billy easily match the intensity of this opening onslaught on fist-pumping joints like "Real Nigga Hillfiggaz" and "Downtown Swinga '98," the third in their trilogy of Brooklyn-pride anthems. However, it's a slew of additional dynamic guest appearances that abet them in fully bringing the ruckus. "Down For Whateva" finds the pair receiving strong lyrical assistance from Bushwick neighbor O.C. over Preem's jagged rhythm guitar stabs. "My Kinda Nigga II" reunites them with Jersey posse princess Heather B. within Da Beatminerz' ominous sounds cape of bass and drum minimalism. "I Luv" is "My Favorite Things" gone ghetto, with a passionate performance by rap O.G. Freddie Foxxx. Both "Salute II" and "BKLN-JRSY" find Gang Starr and Naughty by Nature's Treach effortlessly meshing their own distinctive styles with those of the Brownsville gutter rats.

Continuing the guitar experimentation that began with their first LP, To The Death's "Rugged Neva Smooth," and last year's Handle Ur Business EP, the explosive Laze E Laze-produced first single, "4 Alarm Blaze," enlists a loop from Survivor's Rocky III theme, "Eye Of The Tiger."

With propulsive cameos from Teflon and BK rap kingpin Jay-Z, "4 Alarm Blaze" stands to be yet another M.O.P. classic for the ages.

"We always seen Jay around since he was down with that group Original Flavor," Fame recalls. "He was there in the studio when we was doin' that song and was like, 'I wanna get on that joint.' It was dope that he came through like that." Yo, what’s up, rap fans! Here is an article written about a rap band by the name “M.O.P.” which is shortened for “Mash Out Posse.” As you can see, it’s two boys in a group, one named Billy Danze and the other who is smaller Lil’ Fame. I bring to you the hottest rap band in NY City.

Their release “First Family 4 Life” on Relativity Records represents the
straight up ghetto shit. Now, a few words from the two boys:"You got all types of hip-hop but we represent street music," 23-year-old Fame (a/k/a "Fizzy Womack") explains. "That's all we know, so that's the kind of music that we make. The fashion hip-hop's taken over things for the past couple of years so we gotta even it out. After you get tired of listening to that, you're gonna wanna hear the rawness."

"You got everybody else goin' platinum and gettin' all this attention," adds Billy (a/k/a "William Berkowitz"), age 24. "But we got the real hip-hop here. We got what people really need to hear--the straight-up ghetto music."

There you go, a few words from our boys. Now, they had a last album out called “Firing Squad.” Much of “First Family 4 Life’s production is supervised by M.O.P.’s longtime champion, DJ Premiere of Gang Starr.

Thus, consummate, straight-up ghetto music is what the LP delivers in abundance from its adrenaline-inducing outset: "Most dudes don't like the way I rep/The brown-skinned cat with the helluva fast step/Berkowitz/Retreat!/I will never be disconnected from these streets," Billy spits on First Family's Premier-produced opening salvo, "Breakin' The Rules." But while Fame and Billy's high-octane exchanges prove to be as sharp as ever over snapping snares and truncated whistles, the track's added bonus is Preem's chorus, which neatly sums up the group's musical philosophy: "We make ghetto music/Rock that/When it drops if it's proper/Cop that! /Cuz some cats be fakin' the moves/In other words, breakin' the rules/Stop that!"

Fame and Billy easily match the intensity of this opening onslaught on fist-pumping joints like "Real Nigga Hillfiggaz" and "Downtown Swinga '98," the third in their trilogy of Brooklyn-pride anthems. However, it's a slew of additional dynamic guest appearances that abet them in fully bringing the ruckus. "Down For Whateva" finds the pair receiving strong lyrical assistance from Bushwick neighbor O.C. over Preem's jagged rhythm guitar stabs. "My Kinda Nigga II" reunites them with Jersey posse princess Heather B. within Da Beatminerz' omnous sounds cape of bass and drum minimalism. "I Luv" is "My Favorite Things" gone ghetto, with a passionate performance by rap O.G. Freddie Foxxx. Both "Salute II" and "BKLN-JRSY" find Gang Starr and Naughty by Nature's Treach effortlessly meshing their own distinctive styles with those of the Brownsville gutter rats.

Continuing the guitar experimentation that began with their first LP, To The Death's "Rugged Neva Smooth," and last year's Handle Ur Business EP, the explosive Laze E Laze-produced first single, "4 Alarm Blaze," enlists a loop from Survivor's Rocky III theme, "Eye Of The Tiger."

With propulsive cameos from Teflon and BK rap kingpin Jay-Z, "4 Alarm Blaze" stands to be yet another M.O.P. classic for the ages.

"We always seen Jay around since he was down with that group Original Flavor," Fame recalls. "He was there in the studio when we was doin' that song and was like, 'I wanna get on that joint.' It was dope that he came through like that."

Yo, what’s up, rap fans! Here is an article written about a rap band by the name “M.O.P.” which is shortened for “Mash Out Posse.” As you can see, it’s two boys in a group, one named Billy Danze and the other who is smaller Lil’ Fame. I bring to you the hottest rap band in NY City.

Their release “First Family 4 Life” on Relativity Records represents the
straight up ghetto shit. Now, a few words from the two boys:"You got all types of hip-hop but we represent street music," 23-year-old Fame (a/k/a "Fizzy Womack") explains. "That's all we know, so that's the kind of music that we make. The fashion hip-hop's taken over things for the past couple of years so we gotta even it out. After you get tired of listening to that, you're gonna wanna hear the rawness."

"You got everybody else goin' platinum and gettin' all this attention," adds Billy (a/k/a "William Berkowitz"), age 24. "But we got the real hip-hop here. We got what people really need to hear--the straight-up ghetto music."

There you go, a few words from our boys. Now, they had a last album out called “Firing Squad.” Much of “First Family 4 Life’s production is supervised by M.O.P.’s longtime champion, DJ Premiere of Gang Starr.

Thus, consummate, straight-up ghetto music is what the LP delivers in abundance from its adrenaline-inducing outset: "Most dudes don't like the way I rep/The brown-skinned cat with the helluva fast step/Berkowitz/Retreat!/I will never be disconnected from these streets," Billy spits on First Family's Premier-produced opening salvo, "Breakin' The Rules." But while Fame and Billy's high-octane exchanges prove to be as sharp as ever over snapping snares and truncated whistles, the track's added bonus is Preem's chorus, which neatly sums up the group's musical philosophy: "We make ghetto music/Rock that/When it drops if it's proper/Cop that! /Cuz some cats be fakin' the moves/In other words, breakin' the rules/Stop that!"

Fame and Billy easily match the intensity of this opening onslaught on fist-pumping joints like "Real Nigga Hillfiggaz" and "Downtown Swinga '98," the third in their trilogy of Brooklyn-pride anthems. However, it's a slew of additional dynamic guest appearances that abet them in fully bringing the ruckus. "Down For Whateva" finds the pair receiving strong lyrical assistance from Bushwick neighbor O.C. over Preem's jagged rhythm guitar stabs. "My Kinda Nigga II" reunites them with Jersey posse princess Heather B. within Da Beatminerz' ominous sounds cape of bass and drum minimalism. "I Luv" is "My Favorite Things" gone ghetto, with a passionate performance by rap O.G. Freddie Foxxx. Both "Salute II" and "BKLN-JRSY" find Gang Starr and Naughty by Nature's Treach effortlessly meshing their own distinctive styles with those of the Brownsville gutter rats.

Continuing the guitar experimentation that began with their first LP, To The Death's "Rugged Neva Smooth," and last year's Handle Ur Business EP, the explosive Laze E Laze-produced first single, "4 Alarm Blaze," enlists a loop from Survivor's Rocky III theme, "Eye Of The Tiger."

With propulsive cameos from Teflon and BK rap kingpin Jay-Z, "4 Alarm Blaze" stands to be yet another M.O.P. classic for the ages.

"We always seen Jay around since he was down with that group Original Flavor," Fame recalls. "He was there in the studio when we was doin' that song and was like, 'I wanna get on that joint.' It was dope that he came through like that."

Source: http://www.sing365.com